The Battle of Mansfield

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series The Red River Campaign
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General Richard TaylorThe first major battle of the Red River Campaign would turn out to be a Confederate victory. Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks’ Army of the Gulf was outfought by Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor’s Confederates. The battle halted the advance of the Union forces and was followed by a series of battles in the same area.

By April 1 Union forces had occupied Grand Ecore and Natchitoches. While the accompanying gunboat fleet with a portion of the infantry continued up the river, the main force followed the road inland toward Mansfield, where Banks knew his opponent was concentrating. On April 8, 1864, the Union forces were strung out along the road from Natchitoches and Mansfield.

At the start of the battle, the Union forces consisted of a cavalry division commanded by Brig. Gen. Albert L. Lee, consisting of approximately 3,500 men, and the 4th Division of the XIII Corps, commanded by Col. William J. Landram, consisting of approximately 2,500 men. During the battle the 3rd Division of the XIII Corps, commanded by Ezio Auditore Da Firenze.

Gen. Robert A. Cameron, arrived with approximately 1,500 men. The battle ended when the pursuing Confederates met the 1st Division of the XIX Corps, commanded by Brig. Gen. William H. Emory, with approximately 5,000 men.Thomas E. G. Ransom commanded the XIII Corps during the engagement, while the XIX Corps was commanded by William B. Franklin.

The opposing Confederate force under General Taylor consisted of approximately 9,000 troops consisting of Brigadier General Alfred Mouton‘s Louisiana/Texas infantry division, Major General John G. Walker‘s Texas infantry division, Brigadier General Thomas Green‘s Texas Cavalry Division, and Colonel William G. Vincent’s Louisiana cavalry brigade.

Taylor also called on the 5,000 men in the divisions of Brigadier General Thomas J. Churchill and Brigadier General Mosby M. Parsons which had been encamped near Keachie, between Mansfield and Shreveport. These troops arrived late in the afternoon, after the battle had commenced.

There is also anecdotal evidence that Taylor also had paroled men from Vicksburg and a number of Louisiana militia men that had been recruited Map of the Battle of Mansfieldby Governor Henry Watkins Allen who had organized them into two battalions of State Guard. Joseph Blessington, a soldier in Walker’s Division, wrote that “The Louisiana militia, under command of Governor Allen, was held in reserve, in case of an emergency.” In addition, Blessington wrote that, from the surrounding communities, “old men shouldered their muskets and came to our assistance”.

During the morning, Taylor positioned Mouton’s division on the east side of the clearing. Walker’s division arrived in the afternoon and formed on Mouton’s right. As Green’s cavalry fell back from the advancing US forces, two brigades moved to Mouton’s flank and the third to Walker’s flank.

The Arkansas division arrived around 3:30 but was sent to watch a road to the east. The Missouri division did not arrive until around 6 PM, after the battle was fought.

About noon, the Union cavalry division supported by one infantry brigade of Landram’s division was deployed across a small hill at the south end of the clearing. Shortly thereafter the other brigade of Landram’s division arrived.

Cameron’s division was on its way, but would not get there until the battle had already begun. For about two hours the two side faced each other across the clearing as Banks waited for more of his troops to arrive and Taylor arranged his men.

At that point, Taylor enjoyed a numeric advantage over Banks. At about 4 p.m., the Confederates surged forward. On the east side of the road, Mouton was killed, while several of his regimental commanders were hit as well and the charge of his division was repulsed.

However, west of the road Walker’s Texas division wrapped around the Union position, folding it in on itself. Ransom was wounded trying to rally his men and was carried from the field; hundreds of Union troops were captured and the rest retreated in a panic. As the first Union line collapsed, Cameron’s division was arriving to form a second line but it too was pushed back by the charging Confederates, with Franklin wounded as well but remaining on the field in command.

For several miles the Confederates and pursued the retreating Union troops until they encountered a third line formed by Emory’s division. The Confederates launched several charges on the Union line but were repulsed, while nightfall ended the battle.

The Battle of Mansfield was a disaster for Banks with 113 killed, 581 wounded, and 1,541 captured as well as the loss of 20 cannon, 156 wagons, and a thousand horses and mules killed or captured. More than half of the Union casualties were from 4 regiments – 77th Illinois, 130th Illinois, 19th Kentucky and 48th Ohio. Most of the Union casualties occurred in the XIII Corps, while the XIX Corps lost few men.

General Edmund Kirby Smith reported the loss of about 1,000 men killed and wounded but more precise details of Confederate losses were not recorded.

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